Calendar Comments – January 19th

My family history event for January 19th is the birth of Percy James Crackett in 1899 in Newcastle-upon-Tyne. He was one of 8 children, some born in London and some in Northumberland. His parents were David Crackett (1862-1924)  and Sarah Alice Meadows Gillies. By 1911 the family were living in Stakeford. I have traced this line back to Lowick in the late 1700s/early 1800s, but have still not managed to make the paper trail connection to my own Cracketts who were living in the same area at the same time.

Calendar Comments – January 14th

My family history event for January 14th is:

  • 1827 – Baptism of Mary Cracket on 14th January 1827 at Lowick, Northumberland. Mary’s parents were James Cracket and Elizabeth Henderson. I am still trying to figure out how this little branch attaches to my tree, but they have the right name, timeframe and location to be a strong possibility for relatives.
I also have three more recent events on January 14th, two Cracketts and one from a Turner collateral line in the USA.

Barrington Colliery

In the latter half of the 1700s my Cracket / Crackett relatives were agricultural labourers in the Lowick, Kyloe, Shoreswood and Norham area of North Northumberland. With the opening of pits around that area many of them moved into the mines. It is interesting to see that as old pits closed and new pits opened they migrated south en masse to the Chevington, Barrington, Bedlington and Choppington collieries. My granda George Crackett (1890-1978) grew up in the hamlet of Choppington Colliery. 12042782_1664016537218452_3407140090025408738_n

This undated photo is of Barrington Colliery. I do not have a full overview of which of my Cracketts may have worked there, but one who most likely did is my granda’s uncle George, born 1833 at Cornhill-on-Tweed. In the 1871 census this George Crackett is living in the hamlet of Barrington Colliery and has the occupation coal miner. (Thanks to Geoff on the facebook group: Sixtownships History Group for allowing me to borrow his photo.)

New Crackett 4th cousin twice removed

LinkedIn snipThe power of social media :)  A young man viewed my LinkedIn profile today because we share an uncommon surname: Crackett. I looked at his profile, recognised the name and looked him up in my tree and found that he is my 4C2R. The ancestral couple that we share are my 3rd great grandfather, William Cracket, born about 1791 in the Lowick area and his probable wife Isabella Gowans, shown on some documents as Bell Cracket, born about 1795 at Holburn in Northumberland. Since they are his 5th great grandparents that gives us the “twice removed” from the two generation difference in our relationship to them.

Obscure Ormstons

My Welsh cousin is looking for her Northumbrian Ormston ancestors but not having much luck.Looking at the census I see it is a more common surname than I initially thought. We have had a couple of days at Woodhorn and found some. Based on the information gathered so far we then tried several churchyards but had no success. No Ormston headstones at Lowick St. John, Kyloe St. Nicholas, Norham St. Cuthbert, St. Mary Belford, Beadnell St. Ebba, Bamburgh St. Aidan or North Sunderland.

If you are researching Ormston from Northumberland drop me a comment and I can put you in touch with my cousin.

146 years ago today

My first cousin twice removed, William Cracket, was born on 17 June 1866 at Scotland Gate in Northumberland. This William is the son of my great grand uncle Thomas Cracket, born about 1844 in Lowick and the grandson of my great great grandparents William Cracket and Elisabeth Tait. Cousin William of 1866 married Frances Jackson Lumsden and had five children.

A Cracket marriage in 1777

I have tried tackling my Crackett/Cracket line in both directions: Working backwards from me and working forwards from the oldest I can find in Northumberland. I still have a gap that I cannot close though. The oldest marriage I have found was in Lowick in 1777 between David Cracket and Jane Jackson (Jaxon), but I have not been able to prove yet that they belong to me.