School prizes put to use

I added two more books about Northumberland to my list of  Publications used this weekend. Both written by Nancy Ridley. These were form prizes from my time in Form IV and Form VI. Books that have barely been opened for 40 years. Who would have thought that they would turn out to be useful now for genealogy research. Interesting to see that as I received these books around the time of decimalisation they have the price shown in both old and new money. One was 30/- (£1.50) and the other 36/- (£1.80). I remember that both were considered to be expensive books at the time. Since I attended the Duchess’s Grammar School all prize books were signed and presented by the Duchess of Northumberland.

Setting the scene

I find historical DVDs useful in giving me a feel for the environments in which my ancestors lived. I have started to list up some of the interesting DVD’s I have watched on my Publications used page. Topics for recent viewings related to my genealogy research include Border Reivers, Tyneside, The Somme, The Home Guard and North East England.

(This is a catch-up post for missing my postaday on Thursday 10th May, which brings me back up to date again.)

NDFHS Parish Register Series

I spent yesterday evening socialising with a couple of old friends and since we gossiped till midnight I made no blog post. Making up for that today by publishing this extra catch-up post so I am still on my postaday target.

I find the NDFHS Parish Register Series useful in identifying which churchyards I want to visit for a photo shoot. My Publications page shows which monumental inscriptions in the series I have in my genealogy research library.

Books I have bought

A while ago I set up a publications page with a view to keeping track of some of the books, magazines and other publications that I have found useful in my genealogy research. I have added 10 books to the list tonight. They range from a guide to family history through techniques for dating photographs to fairly specific local Northumbrian history and photograph collections. I started with a mix of 10 to give a flavour of the type of book I find useful. There are many more on my bookshelves which will be gradually added to the list.

Double dating

No, I am not about to hit the town with a girlfriend and a couple of lads. The concept of double, or dual, dating in record keeping was introduced to deal with the period (different years in different countries) when scientists concluded that the calendar was out of synch with the lunar year and the change was made from Julian dating to Gregorian dating. The change involved disposing of 11 days and moving the start of the year from March to January thus causing the months to be renumbered. I have often wondered why September, October, November and December (7ber, 8ber, 9ber, 10ber) had numbers inconsistent with their place in the calendar year. Now I understand that this was based on their position calculated in the Julian calendar with March as month 1. One effect of the change in England was that people went to their beddy byes on Wednesday 2 Sep 1752 and woke up the next morning on Thursday 14 Sep 1752. Needless to say there were soon riotous mobs screaming to have the missing 11 days of their lives back. For the genealogist it creates some interesting challenges. Records in the mid 1700s can show both OS (old style) and NS (new style dates). This explains some of the problems I had interpreting the Elsdon records I read at Easter so I am going to have to QA my findings. I also need to look more closely into whether I have any errors in my genealogy database because England and Scotland implemented the change at different times. I learn something new every day that I work on this research. If you want to learn more about this calendar change yourself take a look at Chesterfield’s Act.