New format on Ancestry

Course Completion New AncestryHad to smile at this rather pretentious certificate. This is what you get after a half hour e-learning course if you take the little 20 question quiz at the end. The course had the silly title “Learn About Your Ancestors Using the Latest from Ancestry“. The actual content is a run through the main features of the new format, including the Lifestory functionality. I wish they would not call it lifestory, as until you go through and edit each lifestory it can include a number of time related historical events that are totally irrelevant for the ancestor concerned. My objective in taking the course was to see whether to wait or jump in and go over to the new format now. If you are wondering about the result of this decision making process, here is a snippet of my paternal line in the new format:

Snippet new format GWC



I have recently started using iannounce, a useful site for obituaries and other announcements which help my genealogy research. It picks up announcements from about 500 newspapers and is updated daily. I still follow announcements in local Northumbrian papers too, but this site gives a much broader view of UK announcements.

Local books

I have added another 5 local books that have helped my genealogy research to my Publications used page. The pictures of old Northumberland help to develop a better understanding of the world my ancestors lived in. Topics include Amble, RAF Acklington, Tynemouth, Cullercoats and Alnwick.

School prizes put to use

I added two more books about Northumberland to my list of  Publications used this weekend. Both written by Nancy Ridley. These were form prizes from my time in Form IV and Form VI. Books that have barely been opened for 40 years. Who would have thought that they would turn out to be useful now for genealogy research. Interesting to see that as I received these books around the time of decimalisation they have the price shown in both old and new money. One was 30/- (£1.50) and the other 36/- (£1.80). I remember that both were considered to be expensive books at the time. Since I attended the Duchess’s Grammar School all prize books were signed and presented by the Duchess of Northumberland.