Looking at a problem with fresh eyes

20150901_205116I treated myself to a new pair of specs a couple of week ago. Perhaps they will give me some new insight into this little conundrum. I am trying to find proof of whether my theory about a Gowans connection is correct. This death certificate is for William Gowans, aged 74, who died of typhus fever at Alnwick on 12 June 1841. His death was witnessed by Eleanor Gowans. I am trying to figure out whether William was my 4th great grandfather. This hinges on whether or not my probable 3rd great grandfather William Cracket married an Isabella Gowans. If that theory is correct, then the next question to work on is whether William was her father. Paper trail for these folks in the border lands is a bit thin and so far there is nothing substantial popping up in DNA matches to say yea or nay.

Where to find my tree

TreeThe master version of my tree has been developed on my laptop using FTM (Family Tree Maker). I synchronise it regularly with my public tree on Ancestry: Crackett-Webb-Turner-Henderson. I also have versions of my tree on My Heritage, thegenealogist.com, genesreunited and a couple of other sites, but these versions are a little out of date.

If you are interested in my family, drop me a line and I will send you an invitation to view my tree on Ancestry. You do not need to have a subscription. It is possible to establish a free guest account if you want to view an existing tree.

101 years ago today

George Cracket, retired coal miner hewer, died age 78 on 20 June 1911 at Barrington, Bedlington in Northumberland. I belive this George Cracket to be my great grand-uncle born in 1833 in Cornhill-on Tweed to my great great grandparents William Cracket and Elisabeth Tait. Informant for the death was his son John Cracket.

For those of you who got the “draft” title in your reader – Oops, sorry. One of these days I will learn to always check the title before I publish. Sometimes I start to scribble a few weeks in advance then forget to check the heading before I line the post up for publication.

146 years ago today

My first cousin twice removed, William Cracket, was born on 17 June 1866 at Scotland Gate in Northumberland. This William is the son of my great grand uncle Thomas Cracket, born about 1844 in Lowick and the grandson of my great great grandparents William Cracket and Elisabeth Tait. Cousin William of 1866 married Frances Jackson Lumsden and had five children.

Grooming George the groom

George Crackett – Wedding portrait 1915

In my Editing Ellenor post I showed original and restored versions of a wedding portrait for my Granny Crackett (Ellenor Turner). I have also used the same restoration board on rootschat to ask for help with a restoration of her other half. The original photos were the size of a postage stamp. My granda’s photo had a badly damaged surface and was missing part of the left arm. Once again I have been impressed by the offers of help and quality of the restorations.

George Crackett – restored 1

I am undecided about which of two restorations I prefer so I am going to show both of them here (if I can figure out how to do that without the whole post looking very messy).

If you would like to see all of the restoration suggestions then take a look at Restoration – Wedding Portrait GC.

George Crackett – restored 2

Something which has surprised me about this is seeing that my granda was actually quite a good-looking young man. He also appears to the far right in the banner photo at the top of my blog. To see him as a boy and as the old man I knew take a look at my 26 May post 122 years ago today.

Drop me a comment to let me know which of the restorations gives the best rendition of the original.

A Cracket marriage in 1777

I have tried tackling my Crackett/Cracket line in both directions: Working backwards from me and working forwards from the oldest I can find in Northumberland. I still have a gap that I cannot close though. The oldest marriage I have found was in Lowick in 1777 between David Cracket and Jane Jackson (Jaxon), but I have not been able to prove yet that they belong to me.