Medical discharge record

This army medic certainly didn’t mince his words. I found this rather blunt statement in the 1918 records of a 21 year old 2nd cousin twice removed who was discharged as physically unfit for service in the 3rd Northumberland Fusiliers:

Discharge record

Elsewhere in the record it states that the reason the poor chap was unfit was that he had suffered from rickets since childhood. It also states that he was unable to lift a rifle, but that his condition had not prevented him from working as a miner. I suppose he had no choice. However difficult it may have been for him, work in the pit was probably the best option when he was young, despite his disabilities.

I have not posted his name here out of consideration for his living family. He lived in Jarrow. If you think he belongs to you and would like to know more about the full record (several pages), then drop me a line.

Barrington Colliery

In the latter half of the 1700s my Cracket / Crackett relatives were agricultural labourers in the Lowick, Kyloe, Shoreswood and Norham area of North Northumberland. With the opening of pits around that area many of them moved into the mines. It is interesting to see that as old pits closed and new pits opened they migrated south en masse to the Chevington, Barrington, Bedlington and Choppington collieries. My granda George Crackett (1890-1978) grew up in the hamlet of Choppington Colliery. 12042782_1664016537218452_3407140090025408738_n

This undated photo is of Barrington Colliery. I do not have a full overview of which of my Cracketts may have worked there, but one who most likely did is my granda’s uncle George, born 1833 at Cornhill-on-Tweed. In the 1871 census this George Crackett is living in the hamlet of Barrington Colliery and has the occupation coal miner. (Thanks to Geoff on the facebook group: Sixtownships History Group for allowing me to borrow his photo.)

New DNA results

DNA match iconMy attempts to write a daily blog post have fallen a little by the wayside tonight. This is because I am so excited at having two new sets of DNA results to play with. Where do I start? My own third set of results came in from 23andme yesterday. I tested with FTDNA in 2011 and with AncestryDNA in my Easter holidays, then with 23andme in my summer holidays. Match list rolled in yesterday.

When I woke up this morning my brother’s DNA results from AncestryDNA were available.

I have been busy looking at both of these this sets of results this evening and have some very interesting findings, but I need to structure my thoughts before I post more so you will have to bear with me till tomorrow.

Possible 7th great grandparents

James Rutherford and Jane NixonI believe this couple may be my 7th great grandparents. I am currently looking for additional proof that I have identified the correct people. James Rutherford and Jane Nixon married at Simonburn in Northumberland on 23rd May 1738. Vicar clearly had a problem writing in a straight line. The whole page slopes downhill and gets progressively worse as you get nearer the bottom.

3 new topics in DNA plus paper

I was thrilled to receive my relative match list today from the 23andme autosomal test which I took during my summer holidays. Now I just need to find time to figure out what to do with the results and who I would like to try to contact.

I have added three new topics to my page DNA plus paper:23andme relatives

  • 23andme DNA Relatives processed
  • Countries of Ancestry
  • Top Relative Surnames

You can access them from the link in this post or from the menu line of Digging up the Ancients.

New Crackett 4th cousin twice removed

LinkedIn snipThe power of social media :)  A young man viewed my LinkedIn profile today because we share an uncommon surname: Crackett. I looked at his profile, recognised the name and looked him up in my tree and found that he is my 4C2R. The ancestral couple that we share are my 3rd great grandfather, William Cracket, born about 1791 in the Lowick area and his probable wife Isabella Gowans, shown on some documents as Bell Cracket, born about 1795 at Holburn in Northumberland. Since they are his 5th great grandparents that gives us the “twice removed” from the two generation difference in our relationship to them.