Surname list ready for May

Since it is the last day of the month I have updated the starring system on my surname list that indicates the newest names. Stars have been removed from the names added in March. A single star now highlights names added in April. All new names that I add in May will have double stars until the month end. Here is a summary of the names that were new to my genealogy database in April:

Pedigree: Hunter, Other: Air, Burke, Clark, Garland, Lochead, Luckhurst, Marsh, Morgan, Morris, Tiller, Tomlin, Wood, Zulfi

114 years ago today

John Henderson drowned 1898 in Amble Harbour

On 29 April 1898 John Henderson, age 38, fell into Amble Harbour while trying to fix the tiller on a boat. An extensive search was carried out, but John was not found until several days later when the tide washed his body back into the harbour. The photo shows his grave in Amble East Cemetery.

John left behind his pregnant wife Mary and two children: David, age 4, who was later killed in WWI and baby Isabella. Their posthumous child, named John after his Dad, died in September 1899 age 10 months.

I have several John Hendersons in my tree. This John, who met the tragic harbour death, was my granny’s uncle, the eldest son of my 2x great grandparents John Henderson and Margaret Stavers.

Where my readers live

Top countries reading my blog in March and April 2012

Since WordPress started publishing country statistics at the end of February I have readers from 23 countries. Some just with one view, who have dropped in and moved on. The picture shows those countries with more than 5 hits. I have to confess that Norway is top of the list because of some of my own views when I have been looking up something and was not logged in as admin. It is nevertheless encouraging to see that somebody else out there in the big wide world is reading. Even more encouraging that some of these readers have established contact and we are now collaborating on common lines of research.

107 years ago today

Harriet Rutter (née Henderson) - early 1930s at The Drift

Harriet Rutter (née Henderson) – early 1930s at The Drift

This photo shows “Auntie Harriet”, my grandmother’s younger sister. I am dating it as early 1930s as the bottom half of the photo (cropped off here) shows two small girls who were born in 1930 and 1931. Since the caption written on the back by my granny tells me it was taken “at our Harriet’s door” I am assuming it to be taken at The Drift (Chevington Drift). Note the tin bath hanging on the outside wall – used for baths in front of the fire in pit houses.

My great-aunt Harriet Anne Henderson was born 28 Apr 1905 at Amble in Northumberland.  Her parents were Archibald (Archie) Henderson and Margaret Jane Thornton. She married twice, first to John Rutter in 1928, then to Thomas (Tommy) Lindsley in 1977. My mother was very close to her Auntie Harriet who used to visit us regularly and bring her granddaughter to play with me. We alternated between them coming to see us in Amble and us going to see them at the Drift or later in Ferneybeds.

The Christian name Harriet recurs frequently among my Henderson relatives and seems to have been passed down from my 3x great-grandmother Harriet Miller Newton, born in Cullercoats in 1814.

April achievements

As April enters its last weekend I took time out from digging to reflect on what fruit this month’s activities have born. Thanks to the Easter break this has been a good month for my genealogy research. Among my April achievements are:

  • Birth record for 2x great grandfather William Cracket after 2 years of searching
  • 3x great grandparents William Cracket and Isabel (Isabella) possibly Gowans
  • Possible 4x great grandparents William Gowans and Isabella Thompson
  • 4x great grandparents Gabriel Hall and Hannah Hunter (and a lead on a possible earlier wife for Gabriel)
  • New contacts established with researchers that are now collaborating with me on Cracket, Hall and Webb

All in all an acceptable April accomplishment. I wonder if May with its bank holidays will prove as successful.

Another marriage for Gabriel Hall?

A new found contact yesterday has suggested that my 5x great grandfather Gabriel Hall may have had a previous wife before my 5x great grandmother Hannah Hunter in 1765. We are currently looking into whether the 1748 marriage between Gabriel Hall of Elsdon and Jane Hedley refers to the same Gabriel.

Adam Cracket / Adam Crackett

As part of my QA of all the Cracket and Crackett entries in my genealogy database I plan to tackle each first name and reconcile the count and details back to census and BMD records. This should help me to resolve duplicates and connect the dots where there are currently some missing links. To make the task easier I am starting with some of the less common names. If I can confirm them first then their parents and children should fall into place more easily. I picked Adam Cracket / Adam Crackett as the first name to try this exercise. Take a look at my Crackett/Cracket page if you are interested in any of the 6 Adams I found.

Double dating

No, I am not about to hit the town with a girlfriend and a couple of lads. The concept of double, or dual, dating in record keeping was introduced to deal with the period (different years in different countries) when scientists concluded that the calendar was out of synch with the lunar year and the change was made from Julian dating to Gregorian dating. The change involved disposing of 11 days and moving the start of the year from March to January thus causing the months to be renumbered. I have often wondered why September, October, November and December (7ber, 8ber, 9ber, 10ber) had numbers inconsistent with their place in the calendar year. Now I understand that this was based on their position calculated in the Julian calendar with March as month 1. One effect of the change in England was that people went to their beddy byes on Wednesday 2 Sep 1752 and woke up the next morning on Thursday 14 Sep 1752. Needless to say there were soon riotous mobs screaming to have the missing 11 days of their lives back. For the genealogist it creates some interesting challenges. Records in the mid 1700s can show both OS (old style) and NS (new style dates). This explains some of the problems I had interpreting the Elsdon records I read at Easter so I am going to have to QA my findings. I also need to look more closely into whether I have any errors in my genealogy database because England and Scotland implemented the change at different times. I learn something new every day that I work on this research. If you want to learn more about this calendar change yourself take a look at Chesterfield’s Act.

152 years ago today

William Cracket, coal miner, died at Broomhill, East Chevington on 23 April 1860. I believe this William to be my great granduncle, born in Lowick in 1840 to my great great grandparents William Cracket and Elisabeth Tait. William had suffered from consumption for several months. The informant on the death certificate is William Cracket of Broomhill, East Chevington, who I am assuming to be his Dad.

Blossoming blog

Just realised that with my last post I hit a total of 75 posts and 45 pages. Not bad going for a novice blogger, even if I say so myself. Next blogging challenge that I am going to set myself is to become more proficient in spicing up the content with photos to make it a bit more interesting for my readers. Yes, I do have readers. Not a great number yet, as I have not widely publicised the link, but there are a faithful few and the number is growing steadily. My thanks to those of you who have given me encouragement along the way.

There are comment boxes where you can share your thoughts on the content, suggest new topics or let me know if you think we may be related. If you see any factual errors or find any broken links as you are reading please drop me a comment so I can fix them. The comment options show up as a think bubble on posts and as a box at the bottom of each page. If you want to tell me which posts you like best without having to write a comment then you can try out the 5-star system under each post.