Family history through the alphabet – F is for Fecund Forebears

F is for Fecund Forebears

My tree has many branches because large numbers of offspring appear to have been the norm among the mining, fishing and farming families of North-East England and Scotland. Three of my grandparents are from large families. Grandmother Ellenor Turner was the seventh child of ten. Grandmother Margaret Jane Henderson was the third child of seven. Grandfather George Crackett was the eighth child of ten. (Shown in the banner of my blog).

Taking it back one generation further the big families include: Cracket 8, Parkinson 5, Carr 5, Henderson 7, Thornton 11. Similar trends can be seen in the earlier generations too with most of the couples having somewhere between 5 and 10 children.

F is for findmypast

F is also for findmypast which is one of the resources I find most useful for my genealogy research. I find their transcriptions among the most reliable, although Cracket has on occasion been twisted to Crackel. So far I have just used the UK site, but expect I am soon going to have to take a look at both Ireland and Australia. I have not managed to figure out yet whether having a subscription for one country gives any discount opportunities for the other countries.

If you would like to know more about this alphabet challenge take a look at Family History through the Alphabet.

May modus operandi

Most of my genealogy research so far has been structured according what grabs my interest on a particular day and what mood I am in. The Easter break was the first time I tried to set myself some more structured plans. Although I did not manage everything on the list it did help me to not wander too far off track, so I am going to do the same for May. Focus areas this month (unless of course I get sidetracked onto something much more fun to follow up) are:

  • Register all of the Murray, Winning and Lemcke information that I have been working on with my Aberdeenshire cousin and follow up other interesting leads he feeds to me. Will probably take the whole month doing a few each day to get up to date.
  • 1st week: Tie together in my tree on Ancestry the families of my 2x great grandfather William Cracket and his siblings Adam, David, Margaret, Mark and Jane
  • 2nd week: Sift through the Oliver and Thornton notes I made at Woodhorn at Easter
  • 3rd week: Bang my head against that Webb brick wall again. Maybe some day it might crumble when I look at it from a different angle
  • 4th week: Feel I am on a roll with my Halls of Elsdon so I might see where Gabriel & Hannah take me next
  • 5th week: See what is behind Ancestry’s shaking leaves on my Carr line

Calendar events early April

My ancestral calendar includes these events in the first two weeks of April:

  • Apr 1: 102 years since the death of Anna Elvina Winning née Lemcke who died in Aberdeen aged 39 on 1 April 1910. Anna Elvina Lemcke was my 2nd cousin 3 times removed. Her death record shows cause of death as uncertain.
  • Apr 4: 153 years since the death of Margery Thornton née Hall who died aged 55 at Barrington Colliery in Northumberland on 4 April 1859. Margery died of apoplexy after suffering gastritis for 2 weeks.
  • Apr 7: 70 years since the death of my uncle Sydney Crackett who died at Beverley Base Hospital in Yorkshire aged 24 on 7 April 1942. Syd was a dispatch rider in WWII and was killed in a motor cycle accident.

Approaching Christmas

Christmas 2010

Since creating this blog late October I have had very little time either to pursue my research or write blog articles. Yesterday I released the blog link to my brother and cousin to see if the structure makes sense before I add more content. Will try to add more in the Christmas hols and make a New Year resolution to make regular short updates. The family gathering at Christmas will give me an opportunity to dig further into the Webb and Henderson lines and tell my aunt more about her Thornton, Davis, Stavers and Corbett ancestors.