Obscure Ormstons

My Welsh cousin is looking for her Northumbrian Ormston ancestors but not having much luck.Looking at the census I see it is a more common surname than I initially thought. We have had a couple of days at Woodhorn and found some. Based on the information gathered so far we then tried several churchyards but had no success. No Ormston headstones at Lowick St. John, Kyloe St. Nicholas, Norham St. Cuthbert, St. Mary Belford, Beadnell St. Ebba, Bamburgh St. Aidan or North Sunderland.

If you are researching Ormston from Northumberland drop me a comment and I can put you in touch with my cousin.

Family history through the alphabet – J is for Judgement

J is for Judgement

There is more to family history than just collecting and collating facts, certificates and dusty old photographs. It also requires analysis, evaluation and judgement. Among the judgement calls to made are when is a piece of evidence good enough to rely on it and move on. One example being, when I found a William Cracket baptismal record in the right place and close to the ancicipated year could I accept this as great great grandfather William or did I need to keep looking in other nearby locations? That type of judgement cannot be made just on the basis of a single piece of evidence, but should also take into account other sources such as census records, marriage records and death records to reduce the possibility that this may have been another William. Just a short alphabet post for me this time round as I am off exercising some of that judgement trying to break through a couple of Northumbrian brick walls.

If you would like to know more about this alphabet challenge or read alphabet posts from other genealogy bloggers take a look at Family history through the alphabet.

Hectic holiday

Aside

I am so deep into research this week that I have not had time to write blog posts or follow up on comments. Two full days in the Northumberland Archives at Woodhorn and two full days of driving round the county looking at villages and farms where my ancestors lived and tramping through graveyards with the camera. I did plan to write about finds every evening, but time has flown by as I have my cousin staying with me and joining in the fun. Bear with me and I will catch up on responding to comments in the next few days.

July 8, 9, 10

These three days are busy ones in my family history calendar. I have already posted about a marriage on 8th July and two birthdays on 9th July. I can add to that with another birthday on the 8th, a wedding anniversary and 3 more birthdays on the 9th and a birthday on the 10th. Four of the birthdays falling in these three days are for living relatives so I will not be posting details. A happy birthday to all of you reading this and recognising yourselves :)

113 years ago today

My granda, Jonathan Doleman Webb, was born 9 July 1899 at Radcliffe in Northumberland. I never heard anyone call him Jonathan. It was always Jont or Jonty. Jonty was an intelligent man, but growing up in a mining family in the early 1900s he had little opportunity for education and spent his working life down the pit. This photo shows him ready for work. Take a look at the kneepads for crawling through the pit and the carbide lamp hanging from his pocket. I scanned it in situ in the album because the caption underneath is written by my granny. I remember this bike. He used to call it “Sputnik”.

He never talked much about his childhood and now, knowing what my genealogy research has taught me, I realise it must have been a tough one. His Dad Robert Webb was a pitman, and from the few family tales that have survived was clearly not an easy man to live with. Jonty was only two and a half when his Mam, Mary Davis, died of surgical shock after suffering a brain tumour for 8 months. I can only assume that big sister Annetta, who was about 9 at the time, had to roll up her sleeves and help out with toddler Jonty and four year old Edmund. Five years later their Dad married a widow Isabella Sharp and by the time of the 1911 census father, stepmother and the two boys were together but Annetta had left home to live with other relatives. At 14 Jonty started his working life down the pit which continued until he retired from Hauxley Colliery. I suppose I can be thankful that his young age and his occupation in the mines spared him from WWI in which he lost his big brother Edmund.

139 years ago today

My great grand aunt Emma Davis was born on 9 July 1873 at Guidepost, Bedlington in Northumberland. She is the younger sister of my great grandmother Mary Webb (née Davis). It is thanks to Emma’s birth certificate that I got the first clue that my 2 great grandfather George Davis has an Ann Corbett as the mother of his girls. I have still not confirmed a marriage between George and Ann. Emma married Allan Young in 1891 and had 4 children.

130 years ago yesterday

Oops, missed the day. Should have posted this yesterday. My great grandparents, George Murray Turner of Amble and Sarah Ann Carr of Radcliffe, were married 8 July 1882. The ceremony took place in the Wesleyan Chapel at Alnwick in Northumberland by certificate. The certificate shows them both as age 21 which is in accordance with the information I have on their birth dates. Sarah was born in October 1860 and George in May 1861. Their fathers are recorded as William Robinson Turner, shoemaker, and Thomas Carr, miner. However, I now know George to be the illegitimate son of Barbara Murray who married William Robinson Turner in 1864. The witnesses to George and Sarah’s marriage were Sarah Elizabeth Rogers and Leonard Watson. I currently have no idea whether these were friends or relatives.

Family history through the alphabet – I is for Investigative Initiative

I is for Investigative Initiative

One of the things I have learned from my genealogy research is that if you get stuck then try again from a different angle. I use several different online sources and often find that something which may not be indexed on one will turn up on another. I have also learned that it is wise not to be too restrictive on search terms. A wider search can often throw up something that will be filtered out if the search criteria are too narrow. It can also give interesting collateral information about other family members than the object of the search.

I is for Ironside

I is also for Ironside, one of my Scottish pedigree lines which starts with 3x great grandmother Margaret Ironside. Margaret was born in 1816 at New Deer in Aberdeenshire.

If you would like to know more about this alphabet challenge or read I-contributions from other bloggers take a look at Family History Through the Alphabet.