Grooming George the groom

George Crackett – Wedding portrait 1915

In my Editing Ellenor post I showed original and restored versions of a wedding portrait for my Granny Crackett (Ellenor Turner). I have also used the same restoration board on rootschat to ask for help with a restoration of her other half. The original photos were the size of a postage stamp. My granda’s photo had a badly damaged surface and was missing part of the left arm. Once again I have been impressed by the offers of help and quality of the restorations.

George Crackett – restored 1

I am undecided about which of two restorations I prefer so I am going to show both of them here (if I can figure out how to do that without the whole post looking very messy).

If you would like to see all of the restoration suggestions then take a look at Restoration – Wedding Portrait GC.

George Crackett – restored 2

Something which has surprised me about this is seeing that my granda was actually quite a good-looking young man. He also appears to the far right in the banner photo at the top of my blog. To see him as a boy and as the old man I knew take a look at my 26 May post 122 years ago today.

Drop me a comment to let me know which of the restorations gives the best rendition of the original.

Post formats – trying an aside

Aside

Not sure I have full control over what happens when I try a different post format. This one is “Aside”.  Curious to see how it will appear. Just tried applying “Status” format to a post I made yesterday and lost the heading. Have previously tried “Quote” and did not understand what I was doing. There are a few more to play with too, but I think I may have to admit defeat and read the help info first or I might end up with some very weird-looking posts. Definitely need to learn how to use the “Gallery” format so I can do some better presentations of my old photos and cemetery pictures.

Categorisation completed

Status

Categorisation now completed with an alliterative allocation. I had fun trying to figure out how to sort my material then find alliterative category names. In addition to the categories I named in my last post I have now included: Claiming cousins, Crackett connection, Finding forefathers, Locational legacy, Obscure occupations, Research resources, Seeking surnames and Yesterday yarns. The challenge now will be to remember to use the categories when I make new posts. I can already see the advantages. Just browsing through a category can give ideas for new posts. I have not done a full QA of the categorisation yet so if you come across something that looks wrong please drop me a comment so I can fix it.

Changing categories

When I first started blogging I was a bit befuddled about categories and tagging. I initially used categories for surnames in my genealogy research but soon found that was not working for me. As a result I have not categorized more that a handful of posts. Having now gained more experience of writing and viewed many genealogy blogs by other authors I can now see how categories can be used to make the blog easier to navigate. All of the old categories are going to be removed this weekend and I am going to try out a new set. My set of posts named “xx years ago today” will be categorised under:

  • Bygone birthdays
  • Wedlock when
  • Documenting demise

Among my other new categories are:

  • Alphabet activities
  • Publishing progress

I have now learned how to use the bulk edit function, so as the weekend progresses you should see most of my posts moved out of “uncategorized” and over to their new category. You can review the contents of each category from the panel at the right of the blog.

Family history through the alphabet – D is for Deceased

Family History Through the Alphabet - Picture from Gould GenealogyD is for Deceased

I get many comments that it is strange to have a hobby that has so much focus on the dead, but genealogy has also given me several new living relatives, several of whom I have regular correspondence with. As far as the deceased are concerned I see this as an opportunity to document their lives and their fates, which are many and varied. A chance for some of them to be remembered before everyone who may interested in their stories joins them on the list of those who are gone. Among causes of death that I have found are fire, drowning, roof falls, crushed by a pit tub, run over by a steam traction engine, manslaughter, consumption, unsuccessful surgery on a brain tumour and many more. A lot of the fun in this hobby comes from finding out more about these people than just their names and dates. Fascinating to see what kind of lives they led and reflect on the influence that has had on subsequent generations including mine.

D is for Davis

D is also for Davis. My great grandmother, Mary Davis, was born at Whitwood Mere in Yorkshire on Christmas Eve 1868. Great great grandfather George Davis is from Madeley Wood in Shropshire, but came to Northumberland to work in the mines.

D is for deadline

Tonight I am also going to have to admit that D is for deadline. I have just a couple of minutes to get this published as my postaday before Cindarella’s coach turns back into a pumpkin pulled by little white mice.

If you would like to know more about this challenge take a look at Family History the Alphabet.