Family history through the alphabet – A is for Amble

Family History Through the Alphabet – Picture from Genealogy and History News

I rarely jump into weekly blogging topics, but I found this one interesting and challenging so I decided to give it a try. I found this challenge on Genealogy and History News. The idea is to pick a topic each week following the alphabet. The challenge started last week, so I am going to post both A and B topics this week.

A is for Amble

Finding a topic for A was pretty much a no-brainer for me. It had to be Amble in Northumberland where it all started for me, although my arrival in the world was a couple of miles away at the local nursing home in Warkworth. I spent the first 18 years of my life in Amble and return regularly even though I no longer live in England. You can read more of my thoughts about Amble on my Places page.

Norwegian Constitution Day

Norwegians dressed in bunad parading in front ...

Norwegians dressed in bunad parading in front of the royal family on May 17th. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

17 May is a public holiday in Norway to celebrate the signing of the Norwegian Constitution at Eidsvoll in 1814. A fantastic day when people dress up in their bunad (national costume, with local variations) and have parades and games. If you would like to know more about what folks get up to take a look at Norwegian Constitution Day.

This gives me an opportunity to mention that I actually have a handful of Norwegians in my family tree. The Hanson family of Lynemouth, Northumberland are “cousins” of my Granda Webb. Henry Hanson, born in 1879, was a Norwegian seaman who married Elizabeth Doleman in 1902. His father was also a Norwegian seaman named Hans August Hanson. I am still struggling to tie in the paper trail from the Dolemans and Hansons to my grandfather, but I remember being taken to visit the Hansons at Lynemouth when I was little and am sure they belong to us somehow.

114 years ago today

My 3rd great grand aunt Barbara Rennie, née Barbara Murray, died at St. Nicholas in Aberdeen on 16 May 1898. In some earlier records her name is given as Barbra Murray. Barbara, who was the widow of tailor William Rennie, had suffered from influenza for 10 days prior to her death. Take a look at the two posts I made yesterday and you will see that Barbara’s death was only one day out from being 2 years after her brother George Murray and 3 years before her niece and namesake Barbara Murray who was my great great granny.

111 years ago today

Turner family plot in Amble East Cemetery

My great great grandmother Barbara Turner, née Barbara Murray, died at Amble in Northumberland 15 May 1901. This was 5 years to the day after the death of her father George Murray. Barbara was born in Alford in Aberdeenshire, lived part of her life in Coldstream on the borders and lived her married life and raised her son in Amble. She is buried in the Turner family plot in Amble East Cemetery.

This post about great great granny Barbara has the honour of being a milestone in my blogging, bringing me to a total of 100 posts and 45 pages. It also counts as a catch-up post for having missed my postaday yesterday 14th May.

116 years ago today

George Murray, Agnes Dickson Murray and William Murray in Lennel churchyard

On my Easter break I flew into Edinburgh as Ryanair have now stopped their Oslo-Newcastle route. I used the opportunity for a leisurely genealogy research afternoon, driving down the A68 and A697 so I could stop off at Coldstream on the Scotland/England border to hunt for my Murray ancestors. I found 3x great grandfather George Murray, his son William and his 2nd wife Agnes Dickson in Lennel graveyard just outside Coldstream. The headstone leaning over close to the ground is theirs and old George attacked me with a nettle sting as I tried to get underneath to photograph the inscription. He died on 15 May 1896 at Amble in Northumberland, so I was a little surprised to find his name in Lennel graveyard. I plan to publish more photos of the headstone and tell a litte more about his story at the weekend.

Setting the scene

I find historical DVDs useful in giving me a feel for the environments in which my ancestors lived. I have started to list up some of the interesting DVD’s I have watched on my Publications used page. Topics for recent viewings related to my genealogy research include Border Reivers, Tyneside, The Somme, The Home Guard and North East England.

(This is a catch-up post for missing my postaday on Thursday 10th May, which brings me back up to date again.)