A Cracket marriage in 1777

I have tried tackling my Crackett/Cracket line in both directions: Working backwards from me and working forwards from the oldest I can find in Northumberland. I still have a gap that I cannot close though. The oldest marriage I have found was in Lowick in 1777 between David Cracket and Jane Jackson (Jaxon), but I have not been able to prove yet that they belong to me.

A granny-ism

I have spent the day in an office where the air conditioning seemed to be on strike. Since it was nearly 30C outside we were all starting to melt inside. This brought to mind something my granny Webb often said to us in the local dialect when we were “bairns”.

“Tekk ya jumpa off, a’m fair scumfished”.

It can be roughly translated to “Please remove your woollen outer garment, as I am feeling rather warm.” I never did manage to figure out how it would help her to cool down if I shed a layer of clothing, but I am sure there was logic in it somewhere :)

270 years ago today

My 5x great grandparents, Caleb Nesbitt and Susannah Chator, were married on 22 May 1742 at St. John’s, Newcastle-upon-Tyne. This is one of the older dated events I have in my tree. Caleb and Susannah were parents of my 4x great grandmother Jane Nesbitt who married Adam Carr. I have not yet researched whether they had other children.

193 years ago today

My 3x great grandparents, Robert Parkinson and Mary Ann Reay, were married on 22 May 1819 at All Saints, Newcastle-upon-Tyne. They had 7 children. Their middle child, John Parkinson, was my great great grandfather. The transcription of the marriage record on both findmypast and freereg gives her name as Mary Ree. Additional notes on freereg say that the bride’s name was recorded as Mary Reay on the banns. Both are stated to be “of this parish”. Witnesses were James Gordon and Jonan. Scott. I have no information on whether the witnesses may have been friends or relatives. Unfortunately, neither site gives any more information about their abode or fathers’ names.

Family history through the alphabet – C is for Calendar

Family History Through the Alphabet – Picture from Genealogy and History News

C is for Calendar

Surprised you there didn’t I? I bet you all expected me to take the easy option here and go with C is for Crackett. Well of course it is, but before I move on to my family name and the other three C’s in my pedigree I want to take a look at C is for Calendar. I picked up blogging again at the end of February, then during March and April I started thinking more about the dates of events. To begin with I just looked at what may have been happening on a specific date when I was short of inspiration for other topics. Then I realised that it could be fun to take a closer look at what was going on each day in my family history. This lead to my series of posts entitled “xxx years ago today”. These posts have inspired me to try to find out background information about the individuals who have an anniversary so that I can tell you more than just names and dates. Setting up my plan for these calendar event posts has revealed several dates with a lot going on. I wrote a few days ago about the date coincidences in the deaths of my great great granny Barbara Murray Turner, her father George Murray and his sister Barbara Murray Rennie. The busiest day in my family history calendar so far is 9 July which has five birthdays (1873, 1899, 1926, 1949, 1957) and a wedding (1947). Then when we get to November I will be telling you about my granny Crackett giving birth on her own birthday. So far I have 218 days in the year with identified family events, but I will not be blogging about all of them as some relate to living members of the family. 86 of those days have more than one event.

C is for Crackett or Cracket

C is for Crackett, my family name, which developed from Cracket by adding an extra T in the mid 1800s. I currently have over 600 Cracket/Crackett persons in my genealogy database and am now working on verifying vital records and tying together the various branches. If you are a Crackett somewhere out there in the big wide world then drop me a comment and let us see if we can figure out our connection.

C is for Carr

Another C in my pedigree is Carr, starting with great granny Sarah Ann Carr who was born in 1860 at Seaton Delaval in Northumberland.

C is for Corbett

C is also for Corbett. So far I only have great great granny Ann Corbett, who may have been Sarah Ann Corbett. Unfortunately I know little about her yet.

C is for Chator

C is also for Chator. My 5x great grandmother Susannah Chator, born in the early 1700s, is the only one of these I have found so far.

If you would like to know more about this weekly challenge take a look at Family History Through the Alphabet.

School prizes put to use

I added two more books about Northumberland to my list of  Publications used this weekend. Both written by Nancy Ridley. These were form prizes from my time in Form IV and Form VI. Books that have barely been opened for 40 years. Who would have thought that they would turn out to be useful now for genealogy research. Interesting to see that as I received these books around the time of decimalisation they have the price shown in both old and new money. One was 30/- (£1.50) and the other 36/- (£1.80). I remember that both were considered to be expensive books at the time. Since I attended the Duchess’s Grammar School all prize books were signed and presented by the Duchess of Northumberland.

Family history through the alphabet – B is for Birth and Baptism

Family History Through the Alphabet – Picture from Genealogy and History News

B is for Birth and Baptism

For this week’s alphabet challenge I am taking a moment to reflect on the pitfalls that any new genealogist runs into when researching birth dates. It took me a while to realise that I would have a better chance of finding a birth record if I started at the other end of life and was armed with information from death, marriage and census records first. I also made a few mistaken assumptions about birth years from reading baptismal records. I have since learned that having three children baptised on the same day did not necessarily mean triplets. Several of my ancestors waited a couple of years before they wandered over the hills to the church and baptised their children. Another little challenge which some of my family presented me with was the question of where to look for baptismal records as they were non-conformists. I have one set of Cracket ancestors whose childrens’ baptisms are spread over traditional baptism in the local parish church, dissenter records, Presbyterian and Methodist. This year I have also come across another interesting challenge in interpreting birth and baptism dates. This is the dual dating system which operated at the time of the official change from Julian to Gregorian calendar. I wrote about this in my  Double dating post on 24 April 2012.

B is for Bainbridge

In my pedigree B is for Bainbridge starting with great great granny Eleanor Bainbridge born about 1828 or 1829 at Walker in Northumberland.

If you would like to know more about this weekly challenge take a look at Family History Through the Alphabet.