193 years ago today

My 3x great grandparents, Robert Parkinson and Mary Ann Reay, were married on 22 May 1819 at All Saints, Newcastle-upon-Tyne. They had 7 children. Their middle child, John Parkinson, was my great great grandfather. The transcription of the marriage record on both findmypast and freereg gives her name as Mary Ree. Additional notes on freereg say that the bride’s name was recorded as Mary Reay on the banns. Both are stated to be “of this parish”. Witnesses were James Gordon and Jonan. Scott. I have no information on whether the witnesses may have been friends or relatives. Unfortunately, neither site gives any more information about their abode or fathers’ names.

Family history through the alphabet – C is for Calendar

Family History Through the Alphabet – Picture from Genealogy and History News

C is for Calendar

Surprised you there didn’t I? I bet you all expected me to take the easy option here and go with C is for Crackett. Well of course it is, but before I move on to my family name and the other three C’s in my pedigree I want to take a look at C is for Calendar. I picked up blogging again at the end of February, then during March and April I started thinking more about the dates of events. To begin with I just looked at what may have been happening on a specific date when I was short of inspiration for other topics. Then I realised that it could be fun to take a closer look at what was going on each day in my family history. This lead to my series of posts entitled “xxx years ago today”. These posts have inspired me to try to find out background information about the individuals who have an anniversary so that I can tell you more than just names and dates. Setting up my plan for these calendar event posts has revealed several dates with a lot going on. I wrote a few days ago about the date coincidences in the deaths of my great great granny Barbara Murray Turner, her father George Murray and his sister Barbara Murray Rennie. The busiest day in my family history calendar so far is 9 July which has five birthdays (1873, 1899, 1926, 1949, 1957) and a wedding (1947). Then when we get to November I will be telling you about my granny Crackett giving birth on her own birthday. So far I have 218 days in the year with identified family events, but I will not be blogging about all of them as some relate to living members of the family. 86 of those days have more than one event.

C is for Crackett or Cracket

C is for Crackett, my family name, which developed from Cracket by adding an extra T in the mid 1800s. I currently have over 600 Cracket/Crackett persons in my genealogy database and am now working on verifying vital records and tying together the various branches. If you are a Crackett somewhere out there in the big wide world then drop me a comment and let us see if we can figure out our connection.

C is for Carr

Another C in my pedigree is Carr, starting with great granny Sarah Ann Carr who was born in 1860 at Seaton Delaval in Northumberland.

C is for Corbett

C is also for Corbett. So far I only have great great granny Ann Corbett, who may have been Sarah Ann Corbett. Unfortunately I know little about her yet.

C is for Chator

C is also for Chator. My 5x great grandmother Susannah Chator, born in the early 1700s, is the only one of these I have found so far.

If you would like to know more about this weekly challenge take a look at Family History Through the Alphabet.

School prizes put to use

I added two more books about Northumberland to my list of  Publications used this weekend. Both written by Nancy Ridley. These were form prizes from my time in Form IV and Form VI. Books that have barely been opened for 40 years. Who would have thought that they would turn out to be useful now for genealogy research. Interesting to see that as I received these books around the time of decimalisation they have the price shown in both old and new money. One was 30/- (£1.50) and the other 36/- (£1.80). I remember that both were considered to be expensive books at the time. Since I attended the Duchess’s Grammar School all prize books were signed and presented by the Duchess of Northumberland.

Family history through the alphabet – B is for Birth and Baptism

Family History Through the Alphabet – Picture from Genealogy and History News

B is for Birth and Baptism

For this week’s alphabet challenge I am taking a moment to reflect on the pitfalls that any new genealogist runs into when researching birth dates. It took me a while to realise that I would have a better chance of finding a birth record if I started at the other end of life and was armed with information from death, marriage and census records first. I also made a few mistaken assumptions about birth years from reading baptismal records. I have since learned that having three children baptised on the same day did not necessarily mean triplets. Several of my ancestors waited a couple of years before they wandered over the hills to the church and baptised their children. Another little challenge which some of my family presented me with was the question of where to look for baptismal records as they were non-conformists. I have one set of Cracket ancestors whose childrens’ baptisms are spread over traditional baptism in the local parish church, dissenter records, Presbyterian and Methodist. This year I have also come across another interesting challenge in interpreting birth and baptism dates. This is the dual dating system which operated at the time of the official change from Julian to Gregorian calendar. I wrote about this in my  Double dating post on 24 April 2012.

B is for Bainbridge

In my pedigree B is for Bainbridge starting with great great granny Eleanor Bainbridge born about 1828 or 1829 at Walker in Northumberland.

If you would like to know more about this weekly challenge take a look at Family History Through the Alphabet.

Family history through the alphabet – A is for Amble

Family History Through the Alphabet – Picture from Genealogy and History News

I rarely jump into weekly blogging topics, but I found this one interesting and challenging so I decided to give it a try. I found this challenge on Genealogy and History News. The idea is to pick a topic each week following the alphabet. The challenge started last week, so I am going to post both A and B topics this week.

A is for Amble

Finding a topic for A was pretty much a no-brainer for me. It had to be Amble in Northumberland where it all started for me, although my arrival in the world was a couple of miles away at the local nursing home in Warkworth. I spent the first 18 years of my life in Amble and return regularly even though I no longer live in England. You can read more of my thoughts about Amble on my Places page.

Norwegian Constitution Day

Norwegians dressed in bunad parading in front ...

Norwegians dressed in bunad parading in front of the royal family on May 17th. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

17 May is a public holiday in Norway to celebrate the signing of the Norwegian Constitution at Eidsvoll in 1814. A fantastic day when people dress up in their bunad (national costume, with local variations) and have parades and games. If you would like to know more about what folks get up to take a look at Norwegian Constitution Day.

This gives me an opportunity to mention that I actually have a handful of Norwegians in my family tree. The Hanson family of Lynemouth, Northumberland are “cousins” of my Granda Webb. Henry Hanson, born in 1879, was a Norwegian seaman who married Elizabeth Doleman in 1902. His father was also a Norwegian seaman named Hans August Hanson. I am still struggling to tie in the paper trail from the Dolemans and Hansons to my grandfather, but I remember being taken to visit the Hansons at Lynemouth when I was little and am sure they belong to us somehow.

114 years ago today

My 3rd great grand aunt Barbara Rennie, née Barbara Murray, died at St. Nicholas in Aberdeen on 16 May 1898. In some earlier records her name is given as Barbra Murray. Barbara, who was the widow of tailor William Rennie, had suffered from influenza for 10 days prior to her death. Take a look at the two posts I made yesterday and you will see that Barbara’s death was only one day out from being 2 years after her brother George Murray and 3 years before her niece and namesake Barbara Murray who was my great great granny.

111 years ago today

Turner family plot in Amble East Cemetery

My great great grandmother Barbara Turner, née Barbara Murray, died at Amble in Northumberland 15 May 1901. This was 5 years to the day after the death of her father George Murray. Barbara was born in Alford in Aberdeenshire, lived part of her life in Coldstream on the borders and lived her married life and raised her son in Amble. She is buried in the Turner family plot in Amble East Cemetery.

This post about great great granny Barbara has the honour of being a milestone in my blogging, bringing me to a total of 100 posts and 45 pages. It also counts as a catch-up post for having missed my postaday yesterday 14th May.

116 years ago today

George Murray, Agnes Dickson Murray and William Murray in Lennel churchyard

On my Easter break I flew into Edinburgh as Ryanair have now stopped their Oslo-Newcastle route. I used the opportunity for a leisurely genealogy research afternoon, driving down the A68 and A697 so I could stop off at Coldstream on the Scotland/England border to hunt for my Murray ancestors. I found 3x great grandfather George Murray, his son William and his 2nd wife Agnes Dickson in Lennel graveyard just outside Coldstream. The headstone leaning over close to the ground is theirs and old George attacked me with a nettle sting as I tried to get underneath to photograph the inscription. He died on 15 May 1896 at Amble in Northumberland, so I was a little surprised to find his name in Lennel graveyard. I plan to publish more photos of the headstone and tell a litte more about his story at the weekend.