Double dating

No, I am not about to hit the town with a girlfriend and a couple of lads. The concept of double, or dual, dating in record keeping was introduced to deal with the period (different years in different countries) when scientists concluded that the calendar was out of synch with the lunar year and the change was made from Julian dating to Gregorian dating. The change involved disposing of 11 days and moving the start of the year from March to January thus causing the months to be renumbered. I have often wondered why September, October, November and December (7ber, 8ber, 9ber, 10ber) had numbers inconsistent with their place in the calendar year. Now I understand that this was based on their position calculated in the Julian calendar with March as month 1. One effect of the change in England was that people went to their beddy byes on Wednesday 2 Sep 1752 and woke up the next morning on Thursday 14 Sep 1752. Needless to say there were soon riotous mobs screaming to have the missing 11 days of their lives back. For the genealogist it creates some interesting challenges. Records in the mid 1700s can show both OS (old style) and NS (new style dates). This explains some of the problems I had interpreting the Elsdon records I read at Easter so I am going to have to QA my findings. I also need to look more closely into whether I have any errors in my genealogy database because England and Scotland implemented the change at different times. I learn something new every day that I work on this research. If you want to learn more about this calendar change yourself take a look at Chesterfield’s Act.

152 years ago today

William Cracket, coal miner, died at Broomhill, East Chevington on 23 April 1860. I believe this William to be my great granduncle, born in Lowick in 1840 to my great great grandparents William Cracket and Elisabeth Tait. William had suffered from consumption for several months. The informant on the death certificate is William Cracket of Broomhill, East Chevington, who I am assuming to be his Dad.

Blossoming blog

Just realised that with my last post I hit a total of 75 posts and 45 pages. Not bad going for a novice blogger, even if I say so myself. Next blogging challenge that I am going to set myself is to become more proficient in spicing up the content with photos to make it a bit more interesting for my readers. Yes, I do have readers. Not a great number yet, as I have not widely publicised the link, but there are a faithful few and the number is growing steadily. My thanks to those of you who have given me encouragement along the way.

There are comment boxes where you can share your thoughts on the content, suggest new topics or let me know if you think we may be related. If you see any factual errors or find any broken links as you are reading please drop me a comment so I can fix them. The comment options show up as a think bubble on posts and as a box at the bottom of each page. If you want to tell me which posts you like best without having to write a comment then you can try out the 5-star system under each post.

New 2nd cousin-in-law

I have now found a new second cousin-in-law who I am hoping may be able to help me to figure out whether any of my living Spears or Smailes relatives have a treasure trove of documents from my Webb line hidden away in a cupboard. Maybe one step close to finding the clue that will knock down the brick wall behind Robert Webb and Edmund Webb.

53 years ago today

Crackett – Leonard and Mary Jane – Amble West Cemetery

Mary Jane Tweddle died 53 years ago today aged 71. Mary Jane, known in the family as Polly, married my great uncle Leonard Crackett. The picture shows their grave in Amble West Cemetery.

Uncle Len and Aunt Polly lived at Chevington Drift and had one son, Ralph Crackett. It is also interesting that Polly’s brother Ralph married Len’s sister Dorothy Ann Crackett, my great aunt.

Cracket: Counties 1841 – 1911

On my Crackett/Cracket page I have set up an overview of the migratory patterns for Cracket from 1841 to 1911. Bear with me until I figure out how to make the table look tidier by getting rid of some of the “air” between rows. I nearly lost the whole thing by recovering a wrong autosave, so I am not going to play with it any more tonight in case I delete it by mistake and have to start again :) Maybe I need to refresh my memory of html. Understood it about 10 years ago when I used to publish frontpage articles to knowledge bases.